Designing for NetZero Energy

At first glance, designing for Net Zero Energy can seem like a daunting task, which has led many to shy away from pursuing a Net Zero Energy project. In Ohio particularly, there have been few examples to learn from. However, as M+A Architects begins work on the firm’s second Net Zero project in Columbus, they will share the insightful and sustainable lessons learned in a DesignColumbus presentation.

Although it may be intimidating to begin, designing for “absolute zero” can be a very attainable goal. The presentation, given by Kirk Paisley and Jacqueline Langhals, will focus on the team’s design process for Net Zero Energy buildings. The presenters will provide an overview of building science principles and how an understanding of those is essential for all project team members, including the owners. It is vital for the design process and its resulting sustainable solutions to be used as a teaching tool for future user groups, as occupancy behavior is a key component in maintaining Net Zero Energy.

The presentation will relate the design process back to LEED principals, as LEED has been at the forefront when it comes to designing sustainable buildings, and will highlight some of these synergies and draw parallels between LEED and Net Zero.

This year’s keynote speaker, Doug Kridler, is sponsored by The Columbus Foundation’s Green Funds.

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Upcycling St. Clair: Project Design and Neighborhood Redevelopment through Analysis and Branding

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Historic structures such as the old east Ohio Gas research facility in St. Clair can be the catalyst for the resurgence of an historic neighborhood. This facility was identified as a potential structure for redevelopment as a multifamily residence appealing to artists, millennials and boomers.  It was a conceptual project presented to over 600 national developers and other real estate professionals at the Multi-Family Executive conference in Las Vegas this year.

RDL Architects, Inc. conducted a rigorous neighborhood analysis for the old east Ohio Gas research facility, held many stakeholder meetings, worked with the local Community Development Corporation, and analyzed the existing structure and surrounding parcels in order to envision its redevelopment.  Neighborhood planning principles were implemented to identify the best ways to leverage the structure and its surrounding area for redevelopment.

A DesignColumbus presentation by Andrea Bruno, St Clair Superior Development Corporation, along with Gregory Soltis, Kevin Dreyfuss-Wells and Ron Lloyd, all of RDL Architects, will use the project as a case study to share information on how to use neighborhood planning principles to create a list of and map assets and liabilities, then identify a potential brand and identity for use in the neighborhood’s redevelopment. The presenters will also show how to use neighborhood planning principles to define and analyze districts, edges, barriers, various circulation paths, figure-ground relationships, land-use patterns, historic structures, and landmarks. Also discussed will be the prerequisites and credits in the three categories required for LEED-ND certification: Smart Location and Linkage, Neighborhood Pattern and Design, and Green Infrastructure and Buildings.

DesignColumbus will take place on April 20 at COSI.

This year’s keynote speaker, Doug Kridler, is sponsored by The Columbus Foundation’s Green Funds.

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Urban Transformation and Community Building

nulceusAs we move forward in our pursuit of designed places that limit the negative impacts of development on our environment, we need to recognize the ability of sites and buildings to be a key protagonist in the holistic transformation of communities. The act of building and densifying urban cores is in and of itself a sustainable practice, and is critical to the renewal of the hearts of our cities.

Through three case studies local to Columbus and Cleveland — Driving Park Library, 250 High and the nuCLEus Mixed Use Development — the DesignColumbus session “Urban Transformation and Community Building,” by Michael Suriano, Kevin Schellenbach and Daniel Ayars of NBBJ, will explore how different typologies present distinct opportunities in sustainable design practices as tools for urban revitalization and community building. In addition to active design strategies specific to each building type, the session will also explore how unique passive responses to design problems can have a huge impact on use, user mindset, and future growth and stewardship.

In a future where resources are scarce, and time to adapt is finite, it is not enough for buildings to simply create better environments, they must bring us together.

DesignColumbus will take place on April 20 at COSI.

This year’s keynote speaker, Doug Kridler, is sponsored by The Columbus Foundation’s Green Funds.

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Transforming Columbus by Transforming Travel

Photo courtesy potowizard freedigitalphotos.net

Organized in 1993, The Midwest High Speed Rail Association is one of the nation’s leading advocacy organizations for high speed rail. Its mission is to educate the public and increase demand for rail service in the Midwest. The Association works with government officials and the railroad industry, as well as partners with other advocacy groups. Its efforts and research have contributed to the modernization of existing rail lines, construction of new rail lines, and protection of existing local transit options.

Shira Orlowek, Operations Manager for the Midwest High Speed Rail Association, will present “Transforming Columbus by Transforming Travel” at DesignColumbus 2015. The presentation will take a look at Columbus’ vitality as a city through the development of train travel and will explore connecting Columbus to the rest of the Midwest, increasing travel options in Ohio and making High-Speed Rail become a reality.

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This year’s keynote speaker, Doug Kridler, is sponsored by The Columbus Foundation’s Green Funds.

The New James: the Purpose and Process for Sustainability in a World Class Cancer Facility

The new James Cancer Center and Richard Solove Institute at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center is Ohio State’s largest single construction project, but it will be earning a LEED Silver certification as evidence of the sustainable strategies in place. The CCC Tower (at 1,122,228 square feet) and the dozen enabling projects exceed $1 billion in construction costs, and were designed to concentrate patient care, education and research expertise in a single location with the goal of cutting edge treatment.

The presentation will introduce the leader of the project since its inception, Dr. David Schuller, to describe the vision and purpose of the new James and the role of environmental considerations. Design highlights of the facility will be discussed, along with how the university requirements for sustainability were incorporated. Representatives from the Ohio State project management team will discuss overcoming the challenges of the campus location, coordinating the many associated projects, and the new CM at Risk construction delivery method. Innovative choices for educational materials will be shared along with university programs for communicating operational sustainability.

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This year’s keynote speaker, Doug Kridler, is sponsored by The Columbus Foundation’s Green Funds.